April 2018 Meeting – O.C. Artifacts & Stories from the Homestead Museum – Speaker: Paul R. Spitzzeri

While we may think that events in Orange County have, and do happen in a vacuum, sometimes we have to look beyond the geographic boundaries to fully understand our county’s history and those who have lived here. Keeping this in mind, it’s no surprise that we find Orange County stories about people and events — and artifacts — in museums or archives that may surprise us.

The Workman and Temple Family Homestead Museum has an artifact collection of roughly 30,000 objects pertaining to greater Los Angeles, including Orange County, from 1830 to 1930. Members of the Workman and Temple families were involved with Orange County areas, such as the Anaheim Landing project in the late 1860s and early 1870s and oil prospecting at Huntington Beach in the 1920s, but the museum has other material relating to the county and its place in the region.

Paul R. Spitzzeri, the Homestead’s director, will discuss a selection of museum-owned objects dealing with Orange County, including a PowerPoint presentation and a small display of artifacts.

Our meeting will be held on Thursday, April 12th beginning at 7:30 pm at the Trinity Episcopal Church, 2400 N. Canal St., Orange. As always, members and the general public are cordially invited to attend.

May 2018 Event – Historical Walking Food Tour – Saturday, May 12th – Old Towne Orange

Come join the Orange County Historical Society for its annual field trip excursion.  This year we are excited to have planned a Vintage Orange Food Tour through Old Towne Orange on Saturday, May 12, 2018 from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

The tour will provide you with historic and architectural stops, delicious food samplings from a variety of restaurants, visits to distinctive one-of-a-kind shops, exclusive access to Chapman University Film School and seating at Farmer’s Market seasonal cooking demonstration. (Demo subject to change w/o notice) We will not be taking a bus, but meeting up at Ruby’s next to the Orange Train Depot.

You will be responsible for getting to the meet up location the morning of tour. Normally the tour price is $69.00 per person, but for OCHS members/non-members the cost is $45.00/$50.00 per person and includes gratuity.  We need a guarantee of 20 people to attend with a maximum limit of 40.  Early bird registration deadline is Friday, March 30, 2018 and cost of tour is $45.00 per person for OCHS members only.  After the early bird deadline, the tour cost goes up to $50.00 for OCHS members, same as non-member price.  So sign up early as space is limited!

Click here for a printable flier or purchase tickets online with the PayPal link below. To Purchase tickets for multiple people, first add the ticket for your Primary Registrant to the cart, then return to this page before completing your purchase and add additional tickets for the remainder of your party.

You will receive a confirmation of registration via email. All other pertinent information regarding the tour such as meet up location map, parking instructions etc., will be sent to you via email within two weeks of the tour date. OCHS looks forward to having a fantastic historical foodie fun time in Old Towne Orange!

March 2018 Meeting – Saving and Restoring Historic Properties in Orange County – Spsaker: Don Krotee

4th Street Renovation

Preservation and adaptive reuse of Orange County’s wonderful historic commercial and public buildings is always a topic of interest for those who want to save and celebrate our county’s history.  We’re honored to feature long-time, local architect Don Krotee at our March meeting to speak about his work over the last 45 years in restoring and saving many historic properties in Santa Ana and other parts of Orange County.

Don and his company, the Don Krotee Partnership (DKP), usually do the entire planning and design work on projects – ensuring that it adheres to the Secretary of State requirements for National Register of Historic Places.  Sometimes this includes a real property easement around the front elevation of the building (later administering the sale of the easement to a Historic Trust).  In addition, they often coordinate the structural, mechanical, plumbing, and electrical engineering of the project itself.

Over the years, their projects have included the Arcade, Fogelman, and Yanez buildings in central Santa Ana.  He’s also worked on the Musselman Block buildings, YMCA building, and Old OC Court House, among just a few.  Under Don’s guidance, DKP has provided architectural and engineering services on over 550 publicly-bid projects serving more than fifteen municipalities, and multiple school districts and college campuses.

Don is also a recognized artist in both watercolor and line drawings.  He’s had the opportunity to use his talents to show off the beauty of many of his historic projects.  Some of those will be shown as part of his presentation.

Our meeting will be held on Thursday, March 8th beginning at 7:30 pm at the Trinity Episcopal Church, 2400 N. Canal St., Orange. As always, members and the general public are cordially invited to attend.

Emigdio Vasquez, The Legacy of César Chávez (1997)

February 2018 Meeting – Emigdio Vasquez: Orange County Art Treasure – Speaker: Rosemary Vasquez Tuthill

Emigdio Vasquez, The Legacy of César Chávez (1997)
Emigdio Vasquez, The Legacy of César Chávez (1997)

Orange County artist and muralist Emigdio Vasquez created over 400 oil paintings and 32 murals in the cities of Orange, Santa Ana, Fullerton, Anaheim, Irvine, and Placentia.  At a young age, Emigdio began illustrating comic books and painting murals expressing his observations and studies. His paintings and murals evolved and primarily focused on working people, family, culture, and society.  He embodied his observations of the essence of everyday life and memorialized the Chicano working class struggle for survival and dignity.  Emigdio was often credited as the Godfather of Hispanic Art as a painter of reality and social commentary with universal themes, freezing a period of time which resonates even today.

Emigdio’s murals include the “Legacy of Cesar Chavez” at Santa Ana College and he was featured in a recent Getty-sponsored art show at Chapman University’s Guggenheim Museum which featured twenty of his paintings and his mural, “Proletariado de Azlan,” that is located on Chapman property.  Some of Emigdio’s murals were in excess of one hundred feet in length; and many of his murals can still be seen today.   Emigdio passed away several years ago, but his legacy lives on through his work and his children.

For the February meeting, his daughter, Rosemary Vasquez Tuthill, an oil painter and muralist in her own right, will present a video she and her husband created that highlights each of Emigdio’s murals.  In addition to answering questions, she will bring a few of her father’s artworks for audience viewing

The meeting will be held on Thursday, February 8th, beginning at 7:30 pm at the Trinity Episcopal Church, 2400 N. Canal St., Orange.  As always, members and the general public are cordially invited to attend.

January 2018 Meeting – 1868, The Year that Made Orange County – Speaker: Phil Brigandi

Westminster 1886

The transition from Mexican ranchos to American communities came very quickly to the Santa Ana Valley. In fact, in just one year, 1868, most of central and northern Orange County all went on the market, as drought and debt forced the subdivision of the old ranchos.

In less than five years, half a dozen new towns were born, irrigation ditches dug, hundreds of farmers put the land to the plow, railroad surveyors were at work, and the drive had begun to create Orange County. Many of the cities we know today – Santa Ana, Orange, Tustin, Westminster, Garden Grove – were all born in that rush to subdivide and build, and the foundations were laid for Newport Beach, Placentia, Fountain Valley, and other communities. This sudden burst of population and prosperity set the stage for modern Orange County.

For our January meeting, historian Phil Brigandi will describe these momentous events, and discuss the different ways these towns were founded. Some began as real estate investments, pure and simple. Some were founded by men who dreamed of building a city. Some were organized as colonies, with settlers working together for the common good. And some of them just sort of happened as a growing population sought schools, stores, churches, and community.

The meeting will be held on Thursday, January 11th, beginning at 7:30 pm at the Trinity Episcopal Church, 2400 N. Canal St., Orange.  As always, members and the general public are cordially invited to attend.

December 2017 Meeting – It’s Time to Show and Tell!

Show and Tell Evening is back by popular demand and will be the highlight of our December meeting once again. This is the program when members take center stage and share artifacts and treasures from their own collections.

Local history is best told by locals, and this is your chance to share the story of your personal connection to Orange County’s past. So clean out the attic and rummage through Granny’s trunk of treasures and show us what you’ve got!

There will be a sign up sheet when you arrive and participants will be called up one at a time. Everyone is looking forward to seeing and hearing about what you bring to share!

Come to share or just come to see what is shared.  As always, the general public is cordially invited to attend. The meeting will be held on Thursday, December 7 beginning at 7:30 pm at the Trinity Episcopal Church, 2400 N. Canal St., Orange

November 2017 Meeting – The History of Motels in the Golden State – Speaker: Heather M. David

Remember when a vacation stay meant an overnight escape to sparkling blue swimming pools, flashing neon signs, automatic ice machines and bleached white towels?  There was a time when these colorful road-side gems encircled Anaheim’s Disneyland and motels were more than just a place to check in for the night.

This month’s speaker is Heather M. David, a cultural historian and freelance writer. She is the author of the book “Mid-Century by the Bay” and numerous articles on American popular culture and historic preservation. She is an advocate for the preservation of mid-century architecture, art, and signage – with a focus on California Modernism.

Her latest book, “Motel California: A Pictorial History of Motels in the Golden State”, is the story of the rapid rise and subsequent decline of the individually owned mom-and-pop motel in The Golden State. Heather will have books available at the meeting for sale and signing.

Join us for a trip back to the days when Orange County’s roadside was a wonderland of colorful themed motels, restaurants, rooms, pools and signs.

Our meeting will be held on Thursday, November 9 beginning at 7:30 pm (back to our normal time) at the Trinity Episcopal Church, 2400 N. Canal St., Orange.

Photo of Ruth Ann and Henry Segerstrom

October 2017 Meeting – The Segerstrom Family in Orange County – Speaker: Ruth Ann Moriarity

Photo of Ruth Ann and Henry Segerstrom
Photo of Ruth Ann and Henry Segerstrom

October is the traditionally the month of harvest, so it’s the perfect time to feature one of Orange County’s most important agricultural pioneering families: The Segerstroms. From lima bean fields to a luxury shopping destination, The Segerstrom family has left an indelible impression on local history.

This month, we are honored to have Segerstrom Family matriarch, Mrs. Ruth Ann Moriarity as our guest speaker.  Mrs. Moriarity is the only sibling of the late Henry Segerstrom, developer of  South Coast Plaza and generous patron of the arts.  Our meeting will be held on Thursday, October 12 beginning at 7 pm at the Trinity Episcopal Church, 2400 N. Canal St., Orange.

Photo of Henry Segerstrom in front of the South Coast Plaza sign in the early 1960s as construction had just begun.
Photo of Henry Segerstrom in front of the South Coast Plaza sign in the early 1960s as construction had just begun.

Born in Santa Ana in 1923, Mrs. Moriarity has witnessed many changes in Orange County. As family historian, she was the major contributor to this summer’s exhibit during South Coast Plaza’s 50th Anniversary celebration: “Segerstrom Pioneering Spirit: An American Dream”

Mrs. Moriarity will share her personal recollections and show rare images from her vast collection of family photographs.

Don’t miss this special opportunity to hear a first-person account of Orange County’s early days! As always, our general meeting is free and open to the public. Hope to see you there!

September 2017 Meeting – Newport Beach Historical Treasures at the Sherman Library – Speaker: Paul Wormser

The Sherman Library director Paul Wormser will present “Newport Beach Historical Treasures at the Sherman Library” at the Orange County Historical Society’s season kick-off program, Friday September 15th at Sherman Library & Gardens, 2647 E. Coast Hwy, in Corona del Mar. (Note that due to calendar conflicts, the meeting day is Friday and not our normal Thursday.)

A social hour and optional potluck of appetizers and desserts will begin at 6:30 pm, followed by the program at 7:30 pm.  Members are especially invited to this annual OCHS gathering.  The event is also open to the public.  (Potluck food items are encouraged but not required.)

For more than fifty years, Sherman Library has sought to preserve the history of Newport Beach, a community that has gone from a sparsely populated beach town to a commercial center. The documentary history of the city is a testament to this transition.  Drawing upon Sherman Library’s extensive collections, of photographs, maps, postcards, documents and publications, Paul Wormser will share examples of items from Sherman Library’s collections to illustrate episodes in the history of Newport Beach.

Paul Wormser is the Library Director at Sherman Library & Gardens.  The Sherman Library is a non-profit research library, which holds an extensive collection of books and manuscripts related to the history of the Pacific Southwest.  Prior to working at Sherman Library, he worked for the National Archives for more than twenty years in a number of positions, including Archives Director for the National Archives’ Pacific Region, and Deputy Director of the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum. He has a bachelor’s and master’s degree in history from the University of California, Riverside.  He has been active in professional organizations, especially the Society of California Archivists, in which he has held a number of leadership positions, including President. He is currently a member of the California Historical Records Advisory Board, which acts as coordinating body for historical record activities statewide.

The Orange County Historical Society’s 2017 Annual Dinner – Disneyland, Orange County, and the Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow – Thursday, June 8th with Alan Hess

June 8th marks the date for our annual dinner. This dinner event is open to OCHS members and non-members alike, so bring your friends. Disney attire welcome but not mandatory. Register by May 26th by mailing in a completed form or by using the below PayPal form.  For more information, email ochsdinner@gmail.com or call 714-707-7425. Confirmations will be made by email.

Click here for our flyer with addtional details of the event, as well as a registration form.

To register via PayPal, please use the Paypal form below. In order to mix and match ticket types, add a member ticket and select “Buy Now”, then select “Continue Shopping” on the next page. This will return you here to the OCHS homepage.  Please then add a nonmember ticket, upon which both ticket types will appear in your PayPal cart.  The number of tickets of each type can be adjusted from the cart itself