O.C. Social Studies Controversies and the Rise of the New Right

It feels like today’s polarizing political and cultural battles are unique, but there’s nothing new under the sun. Elaine Lewinnek will discuss a fascinating example from local history — “O.C’s Late-‘60s Social Studies Controversies and the Rise of the New Right” — at the Orange County Historical Society’s Feb 11, 2021 meeting, 7:30 p.m., online via Zoom.

To register, visit https://tinyurl.com/OCHSTextbook

Describing her program, Lewinnek writes, “During the late 1960s, liberals and conservatives clashed in passionate debates over California’s state-mandated eighth-grade U.S. history textbook, Land of the Free. Even as minority racial groups won civil rights battles and fought to integrate both the schools and the schools’ social-studies curriculum, another minority—consisting of female white conservatives—fought tenaciously for control over education and public memory, promoting a romanticized view of history.”

Elaine Lewinnek is professor of American Studies at California State University, Fullerton, and chair of the Environmental Studies program there. She is the author of The Working Man’s Reward: Chicago’s Early Suburbs and the Roots of American Sprawl (Oxford University Press, 2014), and is co-author the forthcoming People’s Guide to Orange County (University of California Press). She received her Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University.

The Enchanted Quest of Dana & Ginger Lamb

If adventure has a name, it must be,…. Lamb? Author and researcher Julie Huffman-klinkowitz will tell the story of Orange County authors and adventurers Dana and Ginger Lamb at the Orange County Historical Society’s Jan. 14, 2020 meeting at 7:30 p.m., online via Zoom.

Visit https://tinyurl.com/OCHSLamb to register.

Almost 90 years ago, Dana and Ginger Lamb made headlines as they adventured their way through life, creating experiences and stories that thrilled and entertained their audiences. Followed by young and old alike, the Lambs presented themselves through the media of the day to an international following. Married in 1933, the Lambs became popular authors, lecturers, documentary filmmakers, entrepreneurs, amateur archaeologists, and spies for the U.S. government. Their best-selling books included Enchanted Vagabonds (1938) and Quest for the Lost City (1951). Huffman-klinkowitz will speak about the Lambs’ personal histories, their lives and work, and their impact on several generations of followers.

Julie Huffman-klinkowitz is an independent scholar whose work focuses on local history, genealogy, and popular culture. She holds an undergraduate degree in Anthropology and a MA in Spanish. She is Collections Manager of the Cedar Falls (Iowa) Historical Society. She is co-author of the book, The Enchanted Quest of Dana and Ginger Lamb, and is currently working on an annotated index to the Lambs’ voluminous correspondence, which is held at the Sherman Library in Corona del Mar.

April 2019 Meeting: Hippolyte Bouchard’s Raid on Capistrano!

Way back in 1818, privateers fighting on the behalf of Latin American revolutionaries against the Spanish invaded Mission San Juan Capistrano. Their aim was to obtain supplies to assist in further attacks on Spanish targets, but many of them instead got drunk on the mission’s stores of wine, leading them to cause general mayhem throughout the mission. After wildly ringing the bells and setting fire to some of the Indian dwellings, they sailed southward beyond the horizon, leaving a legacy of buried treasure stories throughout Orange County. Though historians have largely focused on the compelling story of the privateers’ French captain, Hippolyte Bouchard, the stories of the Spanish Californians and Indians at San Juan Capistrano have yet to be thoroughly explored. This talk will examine the strategic challenges the Spanish military and padres faced in defending the mission and highlight the experiences of the mission’s primary inhabitants, the Indians. It will also examine the invasion’s aftermath, which provoked an intensification of long-standing conflicts between the Spanish military and missionaries. At the end of the talk, the speaker will reveal the location of the buried treasure!

Speaker Eric Plunkett is a math and social studies teacher at Travis Ranch Middle School in Yorba Linda. As an Orange County native, he developed an interest in the history of the county and California through his love of hiking. He has recently been researching and writing about the Portolá Expedition with his friend and fellow historian, Phil Brigandi.

Meeting information:

7:30 p.m.
Trinity Episcopal Church
2400 N Canal St, Orange, CA 92865